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The Archives are Emmanuel College's principal repository of manuscripts, print documents and ephemera. It also serves as the location for the EC Students Archery on Administration Building Quad, 1955-1956 records of the College Office's and Department's, as well as, for the preservation of selected community members' papers. Search the collections alphabetically below. Contact us with questions or to view collections that are not online.  

 

 

 

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E  I  N  R

E

Sr. Janet Eisner, SND Presidential Inauguration Collection

Sr. Janet, appointed Acting President in November 1978 was officially elected the twelfth President of Emmanuel College in May 1979 and sworn into office on September 15, 1979. Eisner Inauguration (Sep. 15, 1979), n. IX

The collection contains correspondences pertaining to the appointment of Sr. Janet Eisner as Acting President and President of Emmanuel College. It also contains ephemera (e.g. invitations, programs, and other items) related to and from the inauguration ceremony of Sr. Janet Eisner as the twelfth president of Emmanuel College. The collection covers the period 1978-1979. Some correspondences are undated.

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Sr. Helen Madeline Ingraham, SND Collection

UnprocessedSr. Helen Madeline Ingraham, SND

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Sr. Marie Augusta Neal Collection

UnprocessedSr. Marie Augusta Neal, SND, (1964-1965)

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Collection of Sr. Marie Augusta Neal Social Surveys

In 1965, Sr. Neal became director of the newly organized Research Committee of the Conference of Major Superiors of Women's Institutes (CMSW). In this capacity she directed a "systematic examination of the resources of Sisters in the U.S. for the work of the Church in the post-Conciliar era." Originally planned as a two stage study, the research developed into a many stage, multi-year project. The foundational stages were a 1966 survey of the personnel and resources of American women's religious orders, and a 1967 attitude survey of 139,000 American sisters in apostolic orders. These were followed by a survey of religious in contemplative orders in 1968, the development of an instrument to assess the populations served by religious in the same year, a content analysis of decrees from post-Conciliar renewal chapters in 1973, a partial retest of the 1967 Sisters' Survey in 1968, updates of this survey in 1979-1980 and 1989-1990, and an update of the 1966 congregational survey in 1982.

In addition to her work with the CMSW Research Committee, Sr. Neal also conducted or assisted in several related projects: a self- study by the Jesuits in the provinces of California and Oregon, a multi-national self-study by her own order, the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, and a survey of Catholic Schools in South Africa.

At the heart of Sr. Neal's research is the question of the readiness of religious for renewal and social activism in the direction envisioned by Vatican II. She attempts to determine factors which are conducive for change. She uses the data gathered in the surveys for comparitive studies of religious orders having varying levels of experimentation and displaying different degrees of willingness to change. Central to her research is the use of "scales," multi-item measures of attitude, to measure belief and willingness to change.

The collection contains surveys, many of which were overseen by Sr. Marie Augusta Neal and cover such issues as nuns attitudes in the post-Conciliar period, Catholic education in South Africa and Sister of Notre Dame Assessment of Life and Works for the period between 1967 and 1991. The materials range from questionnaires to reports to statistical data for the time period covered.

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MA Reardon Collection

MA (Mary Agnes) Reardon was a liturgical artist, portraitist and teacher during the 20th century. Born on July 19, 1912, she was the middle child of Mary Agnes (Cashman) and Daniel B. Reardon MD. MA Reardon and her brothers Paul and George grew-up in Quincy, Massachusetts. After graduating from Quincy High School in 1929, she attended Radcliff College and Yale University’s School of Fine Arts where she earned a BA (1934) and BFA (1938), respectively. After earning her degrees, MA Reardon continued to hone her skills earning a honorable mention at the Challoner Prize Foundation (1937) and established a studio at 30 Ipswich Street in Boston, Massachusetts. She participated in many different projects that MA Reardon Self-Portraitincluded: sketching wounded service men of the Second World War (1941-1945), illustrating children’s books (1942-1946), MA Reardon exhibited her work at the Institute of Modern Art, now the Institute of Contemporary Art ( 1944) and assisting David Siqueiros with mural paintings in Mexico (c. 1948-1949).

In the 1950s, in addition to becoming a professor of Art at Emmanuel College in Boston, Reardon began to lead her own artistic projects that would include murals for St. Peter and Paul’s Church (1952), Cardinal Spellman High School (1955-1958), and St. John’s Seminary (c. 1958-1959), all in or around the Boston area.

MA Reardon continued her work into the 1960s when she designed mosaics for at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC (1964-1966, 1970-1973), created a portrait of her brother Justice Paul C. Reardon of the Massachusetts Supreme Court (1966), and won the President’s Medal at the Second International Exposition of Sacred Art in Italy (1966). In the 1970s Reardon not only continued her work at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, but also designed the artwork for the new building of St. Mary’s Cathedral (c. 1973-1977). MA Reardon continued, in her relocated studio at 12 Martins Lane, Hingham, Massachusetts, her artwork into the 1980s when she designed mosaics for St. Louis Cathedral in St. Louis, Missouri. It was during this period that she painted portrait of Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (c. 1979), Robert Gilmore MD (c. 1985) and Judge Francis P. Murphy (c. 1987).

Although MA Reardon entered semi-retirement in the 1990s, she continued to practice her craft by taking part in art exhibits and designing artwork for churches near her home in Hingham, Massachusetts. These included St. Paul’s Church in Hingham (c. 1996) and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Cohasset, Massachusetts (c. 2000). She was honored for her work by Emmanuel College with a honorary doctorate in 1999. MA Reardon died on May 8, 2002, leaving behind an impressive artistic record of liturgical and 20th century artwork.

This collection contains photographs, slides and original artwork of MA Reardon. It also contains correspondences, financial and travels documents, as well as, ephemera that was created and/or collected by MA Reardon throughout her life. The material, which covers the time period c. 1916 through c. 2001, covers the personal, educational and professional life of MA Reardon. The highlights include a photographic and correspondence record of Reardon’s parties, travel and artwork. The collection also contains original artwork by MA Reardon, including sketches of several commissioned works she did throughout her career.Among other formats contain within the collection are clippings, blueprints, photocopies and various publications. Finally, the collection contains material that would be of interest to anyone interested in liturgical art and/or the twentieth century.

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MA Reardon Hingham Home/Studio Photographs and Videos

In 1962 MA (Mary Agnes) Reardon purchased land at 12 Martins Lane from her brother George Daniel Reardon and built a home on the site. In 1976 she began an expansion project that added an art studio to the house and it was in this studio she developed artwork for the St. Louis MA Reardon House (May 2012)Cathedral (St. Louis, M.O.). After her death in 2002, MA Reardon Hingham Home, 2012the heirs of MA Reardon sold the house to Steven Wiener in 2003 and then in 2011 the house was purchased by Jon and Angela Weber. The following year the Webers decided to demolish the building constructed by MA Reardon. Demolition began in the summer of 2012.

This collection contains photographs and videos of the home/studio of MA Reardon, a liturgical artist and Emmanuel College faculty member (1953-1972), at 12 Martins Lane, Hingham, Massachusetts. The collection was created in May and June of 2012, shortly before the demolition of the building. The collection is maintained in digitally in .jpeg (photographs) and .avchd (videos) formats.

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MA Reardon Illustrated Books

Mary Agnes (MA) Reardon was a liturgical artist of the mid and late 20th century, who after graduating from the Yale School of Fine Arts (1938) began her career as an artists of landscapes and portraits. Throughout the 1940s she illustrated several children's books that include: Sir Wilfred Grenfell, (1942) Snow Treasure, (1942) They Came from Scotland, (1944) A Bird in the Hand, (1945) and Giant Mountain (1946). After her successful career as a children's illustrator she participated in the creation of murals and other religiously based art at San Miguel de Allende, Mexico (c. 1948),Snow Treasure Cover St. John's Seminary in Brighton, MA (c. 1958), Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Baltimore, MD (c. 1959), The National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC (c. 1964-1973), St. Mary's Cathedral in San Francisco, CA (1970s), and the St. Louis Cathedral in St. Snow Treasure, 1942Louis, MO (1980s).

Genevieve Fox was a children's author in the 1940s. She died in 1959.

Marie McSwigan, born in 1907, was the author of ten (10) children's books who worked for the Pittsburg Press. She died in 1962.

Clara Ingram Judson, born on May 4, 1879, was the author of over seventy (70) children's books. She received three Newbury awards in the 1950s for the books Abraham Lincoln, Friend of the People (1951), Theodore Roosevelt, Fighting Patriot (1954), and Mr. Justice Holmes (1957), respectively. Ms. Judson died on May 24, 1960.

Anne Molloy was the author of twenty-two (22) books and an admirer of the New England coast where many of her stories were based. She died in 1999.

Frances Fullerton Neilson was educated in both Philadelphia, PA and in England before she moved to New York City. In addition to writing she enjoyed oil painting while raising two (2) sons.

The collection, which documents MA Reardon's early professional art career, contains the 1940s published children books illustrated by MA Reardon. These include: Sir Wilfred Grenfell, (1942) Snow Treasure, (1942) They Came from Scotland, (1944) A Bird in Hand, (1945) and Giant Mountain (1946).

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A  C  D  F  O

A

Alumnae Archives of Emmanuel College

Unprocessed

The Alumnae Archives was founded in 1981 by Ann (Grady) Fleming, ’31, biological sister of Emmanuel’s President Sr. Ann Bartholomew Grady, SND, ‘28 (1960-1969), after serving the College for several decades, in a variety of roles. Mrs. Fleming, prior to her service as the Alumnae Archivist, served as the Alumnae Association president and helped establish an Alumnae Office and in 1953 initiated the Alumnae Fund.Emmanuel College Charter, 1921 She was also appointed to the College Advisory Board in 1956 and served as the executive secretary of the Alumnae Association. In her role as Alumnae Archivist, Mrs. Fleming gathered documents, photographs and ephemera from College Offices and Departments, associated organizations (such as the Alumnae Association) and alumnae. In addition, she created documents, scrapbooks and other ephemera that were used for such events as Alumnae Weekend.

Ann (Grady) Fleming’s ’31 service to Emmanuel College stop in the early 2000s and the Alumni Archives were officially transferred to the Emmanuel College Archives in 2010.

The collection contains memorandums, correspondences, meeting minutes, scrapbooks, newspaper-clipping, photographs and other public documents (e.g. sporting events flyers, reunion weekend flyers) about Emmanuel College (Boston, MA) in the 20th and 21st centuries. The collection also contains material related to Emmanuel students and alumnae. In addition, the Alumnae Archives contains material related to the history of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur.

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C

Barbara Trabold Cirone Photographs and Memorabilia

Unprocessed

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D

Distinction in the Field: Senior Theses of Emmanuel College

Recognized by Emmanuel College in academic year 1954-1955 and overseen by the Office of Academic Affairs, Distinction in the Field or Senior Theses require the student to not only achieve a grade point average of 3.5 in their major field of concentration, but also, in consultation with a Attridge_E_Thumbnailfaculty member, complete and present a thesis to the College Community. The Emmanuel College Archives, under the direction of John P. Healey, Jr. and Dr. Susan von Daum Tholl and with the permission of the Vice-President of Academic Affairs Dr. Joyce De Leo, began to collect these senior theses in the Spring of 2012.

Included are papers and projects by Emmanuel College undergraduate students that cover a wide variety of topics from the academic subjects that are taught at the College. The bulk of the papers date from 2012 through the present. The collection contains digital copies of theses, deposit agreement and submission forms (in .pdf format) from all students who decided to allow the College to maintain their work for researchers. In addition, some students decided to donate their presentation materials (in .pdf format). The collection also contains Works of Distinction calendars (in .pdf format) that contain all the names of students who created a thesis, even those that decided not to donate their work to the archives. They were created by the Office of Academic Affairs in the process of its administrative oversight of the theses.

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Mary Friel Dissertation and Research Materials

Sister Mary Friel grew up in Utica, New York and graduated from Emmanuel College in 1960 with a degree in Biology. In 1963 she joined the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. After teaching in Alaska for a year Ms. Fiel entered Boston College’s graduate school where she wrote a dissertation on the first fifty-five (55) years of Emmanuel College by 1979. The work is entitled A History of Emmanuel College, 1919-1974.EC History Cover, (1980)It was during the late 1970s that Mary Friel joined the Psychology Department of Western Connecticut State University (WCSU) and established, with Dr. Daniel Joynt, the Guidance and Counseling program that she helped run until her retirement from WCSU in 1998.

After retiring from WCSU Sr. Friel, SND became an adjunct professor of Psychology at Manchester Community College (Manchester, CT) where she worked with students of different ages and experiences. Through the course of her career Sr. Friel, SND has worked as a high school guidance counselor in Brockton, Massachusetts and as a tutor at Grace Academy, a middle school for underserved girls in Hartford, Connecticut.

The collection contains the research materials (i.e. recorded interviews and research index cards) and the dissertation that was submitted to Boston College’s Department of Education for the conferral of Mary Friel’s doctorate. Material in this collection covers the social environment in which Emmanuel College was founded and developed in its first fifty-five (55) years of existence. The materials in the collection date from the mid to late 1970s.

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Lucy (Verza) Fitzgerald Papers

Born in Peabody, Massachusetts in 1915, Lucy Marie (Verza) Fitzgerald ‘37 was the daughter of the late Louis and Teresa (Bertoldi) Verza, immigrants from Italy’s Veneto region. She was raised alongside her three sisters while attending St. John, the Baptist, School and St. John’s High School in Peabody, where she was formally introduced to the English Language by the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. She graduated high school in 1933.

In 1933, Ms. Verza entered Boston University, however, she found the student body, the sciences and the German requirement not to her liking and transferred to Emmanuel College where and matriculated as an English student. At Emmanuel, Ms. Verza was a member of the Epilogue staff and the Solidarity of the Blessed Virgin. She was also a member of the Literary Society where she had the opportunity to interview Carl Sandburg, person she would later describe as “crusty, unhappy old man.” Mr. Verza graduated from Emmanuel in 1937 and proceeded two years as a substitute teacher in the Peabody School System. She would later marry Richard W. Fitzgerald and raise a son, Daniel Fitzgerald.

Lucy (Verza) Fitzgerald then shifted her career from teaching to the industrial sector and became a bookkeeper with the Verza Tanning Company. Her duties entailed general ledger accounting that resulted with “columns and columns of figures in my [Lucy Vera Fitzgerald] sleep”. At the Verrza Tanning Company where she assisted her father, Louis Verza, the President, with English translations for correspondences and in meetings. In addition, her duties included being a substitute nurse in the factory. Her recollections of medical emergencies ranged from fractures skulls, to shredded arms and war related seizures. Mrs. (Verza) Fitzgerald would eventually serve as the Assistant Treasurer of both the Verza Tanning Company and the New Hampshire Hide Corporation.

In addition to her career, Lucy (Verza) Fitzgerald was a polymath of the arts, she transcended the mediums of painting, crafting, and the written word to produce oil paintings, crafted flowers, nature decorations and collections of short stories. She exhibited in local art shows and symposia. A passionate reader of English literature, she was happy to convey her passion to students and enthusiasts alike. Lucy M. (Verza) Fitzgerald died on January 22, 2011 at the age of ninety-five (95).

Scope and Content: This collection focuses on the undergraduate work of Lucy (Verza) Fitzgerald ’37 with a particular emphasis on her English compositions and poetry. It also contains a collection of Mrs. Fitzgerald’s family photographs and original artwork. The collection also contains a small segment of Mrs. Fitzgerald’s professional work from the Verza Tanning Company that was owned by her father, Louis Vera, until his death in 1969. The materials date from circa 1920 through circa 2016. Most of the material dates between circa 1920 through circa 1950. Some material has unknown dates.

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Academic Affairs Records

UnprocessedEC Strategic Plan (2002-2007)

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Art Department Records

UnprocessedGallery 5 (Spring 2020)

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C

Cardinal Cushing Construction Collection

By 1963 the plans for the Cardinal Cushing Library (named in honor of Richard Cardinal Cushing, a generous benefactor of the College), drawn by Maginnis and Walsh and Kennedy, called for the creation of a microfilm, seminar and listening rooms, a lecture hall, as well as, stacks designed to hold 200,000 volumes and 93 carrels. The construction of the building was overseen by Walsh Bros.Cardinal Cushing Groundbreaking, Jun. 2, 1963 On June 5, 1965, the new library that occupied 52,880 square feet, was dedicated by Richard Cardinal Cushing who later attended a dinner in honor of its completion at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel. The area, in the Administration Building that previously housed the library, was converted into office space for the Presidents’ Office, the Admissions Office and for faculty.

This collection contains documentation from the construction of the Cardinal Cushing Library, Emmanuel College (Boston, MA) that occurred between 1961 through 1965. The collection contains a non-continuous set of material such as correspondences, memorandum, programs, publication, photographs and blueprints that discuss the development of the construction project and the celebration of its completion. Most of the documentation was created by the College, or its subordinate parts, and was stored by various departments of the College until the materials were transfer to the Emmanuel College Archives in 2010.

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Cardinal Cushing Library Records

The Emmanuel College Library originally occupied one room across from the Assembly Hall on the first floor of the Administration Building with 10,000 volumes available to the community. By June 1932, the Emmanuel College Library occupied three rooms on the first floor of the Administration Building that allowed seating for eighty-eight people and 12,000 volumes. It was also by the 1930s that the Library was acting as a branch library system with the Science Departments (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and Mathematics Department overseeing their own library spaces. Further expansion to the Library occurred in 1936 when two new rooms were added to the Library, one that was devoted to periodicals and the other was used to house collections related to the Greek and German Languages and by June 1938 the Library had a sixth room that housed material for the Latin, Greek and French Departments. By June 1940, a seventh (7) room was added to the Library and was to be used as a work-space for the librarians. In addition, patron services were enhanced with the addition of a charging desk and new chairs and tables.Library Newsletter, 1995

By June 1946, the Library added an eighth (8) room for the History Department that contained space for 3,340 volumes and space for twelve (12) students. It was also during the 1940s that new cork floors and lighting system were installed for the Library. Around 1947, Archbishop Richard Cushing met with Sr. Margaret Patricia Herbert, SND (College President) and Sr. Helen Madeline Ingraham, SND (Academic Dean), members of the Alumnae Board and students and discussed the need for Emmanuel College’s expansion. At the meeting a program entitled “Emmanuel of Tomorrow” was established to raise money for the construction of a science building (Alumnae Hall), a (student) union building (Marian Hall), a faculty house/convent (St. James Hall), residence halls, and a library. By June 1949, the Emmanuel College Library had 29,753 volumes.

Attention to the building of a new Emmanuel College Library began in the 1960s, after the construction of Alumnae Hall (which contained a science library), Marian Hall (which contained a curriculum library), Julie Hall and St. James Hall was completed. Plans for a new $2 million library were drawn by drawn by Maginnis and Walsh and Kennedy, calling for the creation of a microfilm, seminar and listening rooms, a lecture hall, as well as, stacks designed to hold 200,000 volumes and 93 carrels. The Library was to be named after Richard Cardinal Cushing, a generous benefactor of the College. The construction of the building was overseen by Walsh Bros. On June 5, 1965, the new library, that occupied 52,880 square feet, was dedicated by Richard Cardinal Cushing who later attended a dinner in honor of its completion at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel. The area, in the Administration Building that previously housed the Library was converted into office space for the Presidents’ Office, Placement Bureau, and the Admissions Office and for faculty.

The opening of the Cardinal Cushing Library was a symbol of change for the Emmanuel College Library as it developed an inter-institutional cooperative agreement with Simmons College where each extend library privileges of patrons and, by 1968 devised a plan for book purchasing so that the two College Libraries complement each other. In addition, the Emmanuel College Administration relaxed its regulations to allow men into the Library after six o’clock in the evening (1968). In 1976, the Cardinal Cushing Library received a grant from WK Kellogg Foundation Grant that was to be used for the improvement of the College Library’s services through the application of new technologies. This grant was designed to allow the Cardinal Cushing Library to become part of Nelinet, a multi-state New England cooperative library network to provide computerized services. It was in this same year that the Cardinal Cushing Library formed WILL (Walk-In Inter Library Loan) program with several other Boston area colleges (including Simmons College, Wheelock College, Boston State, Wentworth, Hebrew College, Massachusetts College of Art and Suffolk University). Students could borrow books from any of these libraries by presenting their college/university I.D. It was at about this time that the Cardinal Cushing Library contained 111,000 volumes.

As the Cardinal Cushing Library entered the 1980s, it continued its cooperation with other area libraries. However, this time the goal of the joint venture was automation of the card catalog, as Judith Ritter, Library Director, put it automation was necessary to expose students to technology in a world where computers were becoming a tool for everyday use. She continued by underlining that automation would allow staff to focus more on the students and their needs and said that the cost of automating as a consortium would be less than trying to automate alone. By February 1995, the Cardinal Cushing Library had been accepted as an official member of the Fenway Libraries Online (FLO) and the Library card catalogue was being automated (it was during this time the Cardinal Cushing Library switch from the Dewey Decimal Classification System to the Library of Congress Classification System) that would eventually lead to the creation of Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC). In addition to the development of the OPAC the Library began to become technology friendly with the addition of computers, CD-ROM workstations, a fax machine (1993), the internet (1993) and access to almost fifty databases (on CD-ROM and online) by January 1994.

By the turn of the century, the Cardinal Cushing Library had an updated lecture hall that was named in honor of Janet M. Daley, a benefactor of the College and wife of College chair of the Board of Trustees C. Michael Daley. The Janet M. Daley Lecture Hall included: computers, internet access, document camera, VCR, audio CD and DVD player, ceiling projector, and the ability to record lectures. In the summer of 2006 the Cushing Library underwent a renovation that included a new façade, HVAC system installation, a new elevator and restored foyer. This was followed in 2008 with the establishment of the Mulvaney Leadership Institute by Eleanor Mulvaney Seamans ’71 in honor of her parents. In addition to other initiatives at the College, the Mulvaney Leadership Institute funds a special leadership collection of books, located on the Library mezzanine. It is also worth noting here that circa 2009-2010 the Emmanuel College Archives was established as a division of the Cardinal Cushing Library to preserve a coherent history of Emmanuel College in both print and online formats. As of December 2013 the Cardinal Cushing Library had 2,000 active print and electronic databases with sixty-two (62) online subscription databases. As of June 2015 there were 357,181 volumes (print and electronic formats) in the Cardinal Cushing Library Collection.

In addition to providing access to books and periodicals, the Emmanuel College Library has continually aided in the overall development of the students and community it serves. This can be seen when the Library offered lectures on best-selling books (1945), writing across the academic curriculum (2010), supporting the creation of a Learning Assistance Center (1979), establishing a “Movie Madness” Series (1993) and giving concerts to the College community from musically inclined librarians (1987).

This collection contains the records of the Emmanuel College’s Departmental Libraries and the Cardinal Cushing Library from 1923 to 2014. The collection documents the activities and services offered by the Library to Emmanuel College. The collection is organized into four series that cover general library reports, divisions of services/departments, Library renovations and Library outreach and publicity. It contains a wide range of materials that include, but are not limited to Library annual reports, meeting minutes, circulation and accession records, a building program report and informational flyers. The materials in this collection are in hard copy and electronic formats. Electronic documents are in .doc and pdf/a formats.

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E

Education and Pastoral Ministry Program Records

 

The Training Center for Educational and Pastoral Ministry (TCEPM) opened in October 1968 with twenty-two (22) lay and religious women and men with the goal to develop their professional competency and enliven their faith commitment through the integration of different disciplines and of theoretical concepts with practical skills. The resulting Educational and Pastoral Ministry (EPM) Program was committed to education in keeping with the mission of the Catholic Church to promote human dignity. Sr. Claudia Blanchette, SND, (1979-1980)

The degrees offered by EPM included, Education and Pastoral Ministry, Clinical Pastoral Counseling and Pastoral Counseling prepared candidates for a variety of church-related ministries that included coordinating parish religious education, teaching religion to various age groups, planning and implementing liturgical and sacramental programs, pastoral and clinical care on the college campus, in parishes, hospitals and correctional institutions. The degree programs were supplemented by several certificate programs that ranged from Spirituality and Aging, Religious Education and Social Justice and Urban Ministry.

The coursework in the Program was supported by events, such as, “Springtime Sharings” Lecture Series, PRAXIS: Liberation Theology and the United States (1976), an Urban Ministry Colloquium (1985) and a panel on “The Changing Roles of Women in the Church” (1986). These studies were further augment by EPM’s relationships with the Andover Newton Theological School and the Kantor Family Institute, a postgraduate training center for therapists.

In 1993, EPM was renamed the Graduate Programs in Ministry. It was during this time that the Program faced increasing difficulties that ranged from declining enrollment, increase in directed and independent studies that replaced the curriculum of the program at Emmanuel College, and finally, the development of similar programs through the Archdiocese of Boston.

It was this combination of factors that led to the closure of Education and Pastoral Ministry Program on June 30, 1998.

The collection contains the Annual Reports, accreditation materials, program memos, correspondences, program descriptions and newspaper clippings for the Education and Pastoral Ministry Program. In addition, the collection contains student theses on religious and sociological topics. While some material has unknown dates, most documents range between 1965 and 1998.

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English Department Records

The Emmanuel College English Department was created by 1920 to increase awareness and appreciation of the written and spoken word and develop an enjoyment for literature. It served as a requirement, along with Latin, Modern Languages, Philosophy and History, for the attainment of an undergraduate degree. By 1927 nuns were named as members of the teaching staff in the English Department and they included Sister Julie, SND and Sr. Catherine Dorothea, SND.English Department Report Other instructors in the English Department included: Beatrice Mahoney, Mildred Hanon, Sister Mary Mercedes, SND and Sister Berchmans Louise Currie, SND. In the 1930s two events of significance occurred, first, in 1935, the Department required students to meet a minimum threshold to be granted a major in English. Then in 1939, the Department created a minor that was designed to complement and enhance a major field of study.

In the 1948, Sr. Berchmans Louise, SND, in order to provide structure and guide the content that existed in the student newspaper, appointed seven (7) seniors as editors of the new student newspaper the Focus; that was designed to inform students of College and extracurricular activities. As the English Department entered the 1950s its faculty provided teaching support to the graduation requirement known as Western Culture. The purpose ofthis requirement, approved by the College in 1951, was designed to educate students on Judeo-Christian thought from the Roman Empire to contemporary society. By the 1960s, the English Department had among the greatest number of students as majors and reached the entire academic community with its courses and its intellectual social gatherings. Whether it is a speaker, or an honors thesis presentation, or a discussion on Cinema, the Department was known for its coffee and conversation. By this time the Department offered courses in such areas as world literature, Chaucer, Victorian writers, satire, short stories, poetry, literary criticism and American fiction.

In the 1970s and 1980s the foundations of the modern day English Department were evolving through the development of the Writing Center and teacher licensure. By 1977, at the suggestion of Mary G. Mason and Sr. Janet Eisner, SND and the endorsed of College administrators, the Department developed a Writing Center. Its aim was to use small group instruction for remedial grammar and provide additional compositional writing and was primarily directed to the freshman class. By 1982, the Department allowed for a concentration in a literary program and a communication that to develop an understanding of the nature and process of verbal and non-verbal communication in the context of a Liberal Arts education. The goal of the concentration was allow students to prepare for careers in public relations, publishing and advertising.

It was also, by this point, that the English Department had created an educational program for teachers of the English Language. It was designed to train teachers, using analysis and research, how to use understand the historic period, author, genre and technique of the literature. This track would lead to a certificate as an English teacher. By 1994, this program had received recognition from the College’s Education Department and the Interstate Certification Compact. In 1993, the First Year Student Composition program began under the direction of Lisa M. Stepanski and was aimed to improve the writing abilities of new students.

Since 2003, the Department now has offered a program in writing and literature program. This program was designed to prepare students to pursue a graduate degree in fine arts or for a career in publishing by blending literature and intensive writing. In 2011, the English Department became responsible for implanting the degree requirement known as First Year Writing that was designed to replace the First Year Student Composition Program by teaching students writing and research skills. In addition to providing academic support and guidance to students majoring and minoring in English, the faculty of the Department are also involved in advising students who have created their own individualized majors.

The English Department Records at Emmanuel College includes annual reports, curriculum reports and comprehensive examinations and departmental assessments. There are also historical documents describing certain aspects of the literary society at the College and the history of the student newspaper. Miscellaneous documents are also included in the collection.

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F

Facilities Department Records

Throughout its history, the Facilities Department has provided the Emmanuel College community with superior services, modern facilities and a healthy environment. It also has strived to allocate our resources in a fair and cost- Maintenance Worker, 1971-1972 Emmanuel Maintenance Worker, 1971-1972 effective manner and to adapt our processes continually to meet the changing needs of the College. Our staff has been committed to addressing all campus issues and inquiries in a prompt and professional manner.

This collection contains the various documents created by or for Emmanuel College that were used to maintain the institution’s facilities. These documents include the various blueprints of existing and extant buildings on the Emmanuel College main campus and the Notre Dame Campus.

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H

HONOR 2403: Gender and the Urban American Experience Oral Histories

Gender and the Urban American Experience was established in the autumn of 2013 and was initially taught by Dr. Lisa Krisoff Boehm, Professor of History and Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. The course explores the relationships between gender and urban experience in a historical framework. Through this course students gain a greater understanding of modernity and its impact on our lives. The course covers such HONOR 2340 Oral History Pagetopics as: masculinity and its relationship to organized crime and political bosses as well the influences of the middle and upper classes upon the working class.

The interviews conduct in the autumn of 2013 were conducted by the students of alumni and staff who experienced Emmanuel College’s coeducational transition in 2001. These interviews detail the response of the community and what the interviewees experience at Emmanuel College during this time period.

The collection contains student interviews from the class HONOR 2403: Gender and the Urban America American Experience. These nineteen (19) student interviews were conducted from October 2013 through November 2013 and of the interviewees that were students and staff during the time that Emmanuel became coeducational in 2001. The questions in these interviews primarily consist of: 1) what the change from single-sex to coeducational was like for them, 2) what the overall response was of the student body to this change, and 3) what the upper classwomen who had been at Emmanuel for two or more years felt about the coeducational change. Other common questions consist of the activities the interviewees were involved in on campus and what Emmanuel was like for them before it became coeducational.

It should be noted that the interview with Judith Selley was not about Emmanuel College's co-education decision, but an examination of her life by her granddaughter Juliette L. Luchini. Other topics outside of the coeducation of the college may continue to be added in the future.

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Lillian Immig Gallery Correspondence and Records

The Lillian Immig Gallery opened on February 2, 1981 and named after Lillian Immig, an art student who died in the autumn of the previous year. It was originally located on the first floor of the Administration Building as an instructional gallery to further the education of the students and the College community. Around 1992, the Lillian Immig Gallery was moved from the Administration Building to the second floor of the Cardinal Cushing Library. Then around 2010 the Immig Gallery was closed to allow for the creation of a College Archives. The gallery was replaced by Gallery 5, located in the Eisner Administration Building.

The Lillian Immig Gallery Correspondence and Records at Emmanuel College includes gallery exhibition programs, postcards, artist resumes and correspondence. There are also documents from the administration of the Lillian Immig Gallery and correspondence. In addition, there are records from the Art Department at Emmanuel including administration records and course records.

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Nursing Department Records

Unprocessed

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Office of Development and Alumni Relations Records

Unprocessed

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Office Marketing and Communications Records

The Office of Marketing and Communications was established in 2008 as a replacement for the Office of Communications and Community Relations (later renamed Office of Government, Community and Public Relations) and its predecessor the Office of Public Relations whose responsibilities were institutional publications and web site content.

The Office of Marketing and Communications continues the mission of its predecessors by effectively communicate the Emmanuel brand to a variety of internal and external audiences-prospective students, alumni, parents and families, current students, faculty, staff, neighbors and more. EC Viewbook, (2017-2018)The goals of communication initiatives produced by the department are to: raise awareness of the Emmanuel mission and unique value proposition; support the College's strategic priorities and business objectives; and celebrate outcomes of a challenging and transformative educational experience. The office oversees the College's visual identity, the production of print publications, the main website, institutional social media presence, video, news and media relations.

The collection contains viewbooks, memorandums, photographic and video material produced by or for Emmanuel College. Although there are records that have unknown dates, the remaining documents, photographs and videos can be dated between 1980 through the present. The material in this collection reflect the goals of the Office of Marketing and Communications to promote Emmanuel’s brand for a variety of audiences. This is done to raise awareness of the College’s mission and support the College's strategic priorities.

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Office of Public Relations Records

UnprocessedInterchange, (May 8, 1983)

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Presidents’ Office Collection

UnprocessedSr. Alice Keating & Alt., (1952-1953)

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Treasures’ Office Records

The Treasurer’s Office was established by 1921 when the Treasurer was made an official member of the Board of Trustees on September 24, 1921, soon after the College charter was issued by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Sr. nBerchmans of the Sacred Heart, SND (Catherine Treasurers' Office IconA. Saunders) served as the College’s first treasurer. The Office of the Treasurer seeks to provide the physical, technological and financial resources needed to uphold the College's mission and provide the best learning and working environment for its faculty, staff and students.

Major responsibilities include budgeting and planning, financial accounting, facilities management, information technology management, capital improvements and construction, endowment and investment management. The major goals of the Office are: 1) Monitor the College's financial standing through monthly reporting, 2) Make data-driven decisions, 3) Invest the College's endowment ethically in funds consistent with our mission and Catholic teachings and 4) Evaluate policies and procedures to improve efficacy and efficiency.

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Academic Convocations and Commencements Collection

Unprocessed

The material contains commencement exercise material for Emmanuel College from 1923 to the present. In addition, the collection contains Commencement, (Jun. 1936)academic convocation material from 1979 to the present. The material is in both physical format and digital format.

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Emmanuel College Student Protests Collection

As the 1960s progressed there were protests not only for civil rights and against the Vietnam War, but also for students’ role in College governance, which led to the creation of a Student Bill of Rights at Emmanuel. This process began at the College in the winter of 1969 as commuter students, in an attempt to deal with the cold weather, wore slacks that were not allowed under student regulations. Concurrently Student Protest Statementresident students, through their inter-dormitory council conducted a referendum on student determined curfews. Ninety-one percent (91%) of voting students answered “yes” to the question: “Should students determine their own curfew system by vote?” Responding to these student concerns, the College Administration relaxed its regulations and by March 1969 commuters were allowed to wear slacks and resident students were given permission to set their own curfews.

Once this was accomplished, students had an increased desire to play a greater role in College governance. On April 18, 1970, in an attempt to clarify and strengthen their position in regard to the establishment of policy at the College the students presented the Board of Trustees with a “Bill of Rights.” the Board agreed, in theory, in the implementation of such a document. However, it requested that a committee of students, faculty and administrators study the document before The Board approved implementation. The panel was known as the 3-3-3 Committee because it was composed of three students, three faculty and three administrators. The committee finished its review of the document and the Board of Trustees formally approved the Student Bill of Rights on December 9, 1972.

The Student Protests Collection contains: drafts of the Student Bill of Rights and Demands; the minutes and correspondences of the 3-3-3 Committee; memorandums; announcements/flyers and newspaper and magazine clippings on issues covering student protests, to education, and urban and environmental concerns for the period between the c. 1959 through 1977. Although the collection contains material on issues on campuses across the nation, it focuses on Emmanuel College and Boston, MA.

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Authors and Publications from Emmanuel College

Unprocessed

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The Chapel Speaks Pamphlet

Anastasia Kirby Lundquist, member of the Emmanuel College Class of 1935, has written extensively for print, broadcast and performance, including a series of character sketches for radio and guest appearances on television shows, such as Swan Boat. Among her other publications Chapel Speaks Cover, (2000)is the Christmas Story A Dream of Christmas Eve (1937). During World War II she served as Assistant Director of the American Red Cross Blood Donor Center of Boston, while it was under contract to the U.S. Military. It was during this period that she wrote a series of radio documentaries. Ms. Lundquist has three children: Carl I. Lundquist, Marilyn Anderson and Edward H. Lundquist.

Ms. Lundquist was requested by Sr. Janet Eisner, SND, President of Emmanuel College at the time, and Mary Beatty Muse, ‘41, Chairman of the Chapel Restoration Steering Committee, to write a history of the College Chapel at the time of its restoration. The pamphlet was published by the College in 2000.

This collection contains the pamphlet The Chapel Speaks that discusses the history of the Emmanuel College Chapel from c. 1917 to 1998. The pamphlet contains twenty-four chapters that cover the social role, architecture and history of the chapel in the twentieth century

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Emmanuel Alumnae News

The Emmanuel Alumnae News was released in October 1935, under the leadership of Mary Sheehan ‘29, President of the Alumnae Association and Anne McNamara ‘30, editor. It had the support of the College, as reflected by Sr. Helen Madeline Ingraham, SND, College Dean, who stated Emmanuel Alumnae News, (Oct. 1935)in the publication’s first edition: “It is, then, a joy for me to greet this new Emmanuel activity, the News, and to assure it of the same affectionate interest I have given to every new venture at Emmanuel.” The publication was designed to provide information on Emmanuel College and its alumnae. Of particular interest are the articles the discuss the formation of the Appointment Bureau (also identified as the Placement Bureau or the Bureau of Occupational Assistance), occupational interviews with alumnae, class notes, the role of women in World War II (WWII) and the expansion of Emmanuel College. In the autumn of 1945 the Emmanuel Alumnae News was replaced by the Logos.

This non-consecutive collection is arranged into one (1) series by volume number for all ten (10) volumes that are held by the Emmanuel College Archives. This arrangement was imposed by the Archives Librarian in the absence of an original order.

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Emmanuel College Academic Catalogs

The Emmanuel College Academic Catalog has been in publication since 1919 and serves as a resource that reflects the academic development Academic Catalog Cover, (1962-1963)of the College and its departments. It also provides information on admissions, finances and academic regulations. At various points the catalog has been published by Grffith-Stillings Press and Garamond/Pridemark. Since, at least 2003, the academic catalog has been produced by the Office of Government and Community Relations or the Office of Marketing and Communications. Starting in the 2013-2014 academic year the academic catalog was published online.

The collection contains an almost consecutive run of Emmanuel College Academic Catalogs (except for the academic year 1925-1926). The academic catalogs are stored in their original format, either in hardcopy or .pdf formats. Online copies are also available

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Emmanuel College Alumni Association Periodicals

The Alumnae Association, created on June 8, 1923 with the guidance of Sr. Helen Madeline Ingraham, the College’s first Academic Dean. Meeting in the library, its goal was to promote the welfare of the College and create a strong bond among alumnae. Its original officers were Margret Higgins (President), Elizabeth Logan (Vice-President), Mary Brodbine (Recording Secretary) and Beatrice Hanz (Treasurer). Through theLogos, (1954) years, the Alumnae Association served the College, students and alumnae through several initiatives that included the formation of the Emmanuel Alumnae News in 1935 and the creation of the Appointment Bureau in 1937 that provided counseling, apprenticeships and employment guidance. By the 1940s, as Emmanuel started to think about expansion, the Alumnae Association provided financial supported through the establishment of the Annual Fund in 1952-1953 for the construction of several building projects in the 1950s and the 1960s.

In the 1974, with the help of the Alumnae Office, a telethon to raise money for the College was a successful predecessor to the phonathon that included participation from the College community. In 1982, the Alumnae Association supported the creation of Network of Emmanuel Women (NEW) that was designed to provide alumnae with advice in career goals and the opportunity for professional networking. The effort to prepare women for the workforce was continued in 1983 when the Student/Alumnae Association was launched, a mentoring program that match students with alumnae who worked in their field of interest. In 1995, with the efforts of Lorraine Harding ’48 and Mary Sapienza ’66, the Alumnae Association News was launched to allow alumnae to support the College, fellow alumnae and the Alumnae Association. After Emmanuel College became co-educational in 2001, the Alumnae Association officially changed its name to the Alumni Association.

The Association is designed to keep classmates up-to-date on the numerous special programs and events, in addition to the Reunion Weekend. The Alumni Association is governed by a Board of Directors and partners with the College’s Office of Development and Alumni Relations.

The purpose of the Association shall be to further Emmanuel College’s Catholic mission by challenging alumni to act, lead and give generously to others and to strengthen the bonds between the alumni and the College. The following values will guide the Association’s work: spirituality, service, pride, professionalism, relationships and traditions. The Association will translate into action the strong mission, beliefs and legacy of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur and Emmanuel College by building bridges and inspiring involvement within the alumni community.

This collection contains the periodical publications of the Emmanuel College Alumni Association between 1945 through 1982, as well as 1995 and 1997. The topics discussed in the periodicals include the physical and academic developments of the College for those years, while also highlighting the activities of the Alumnae Association and the achievements of alumnae. It is also important to note that there are gaps in the time period covered for the publications.

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Emmanuel College Alumni Publications

Unprocessed EC Magazine, (Spring 1994)

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Emmanuel College Student Newspapers

The Emmanuel Focus, which started in 1948 with a seven (7) person editorial board and Sr. Berchmans Louise of the English Dept. as the faculty advisor. It was supported by student subscriptions, provided information on campus or religious events. It was not until the late 1960s that the publication began to provide information on national events. By the fall of 1971 the Emmanuel Focus was facing financial difficulties as student Focus II, (Mar. 22, 1976)subscriptions and staff writers dropped and the Emmanuel Focus ceased publication, although for a short period of time there were mimeographed circulation newsletters throughout the campus. Prior to the end of the Emmanuel Focus, in 1966, a segment of the student population, in response to the conservative tone of the Focus established the newsletter Open End that aimed to raise awareness of a student ‘voice’ on campus and was designed to be an unstructured publication to enable it to respond to the changing interests of the student body. By the late 1960s, the publication had ceased.

In October 1974 a new student publication developed entitled Focus II, aimed to inform the student body on contemporary issues. It ceased publication in the early 1980s. It was, however, followed by several other publications that included: the short lived Lapis Ledger (early 1980s), Emmanuel Current (1980s), Current Focus (1990s), Emmanuel College Times (early 2000s) and The Hub (est. 2011).

The Emmanuel College Student Newspapers contains the various student publications and their associated material (e.g. publication correspondences, writing guidelines manual, letters to the editor) between 1948 through 2012. There is no new coverage for the period between 2000 through 2002 and 2005 through 2010. The collection contains a chronologically ordered and consecutive run of newspapers between the fall of 1948 and the spring of 1964. After this date the collection runs in a chronological order, but in a non-consecutive run. The newspapers document contemporary issues of Emmanuel College, the Catholic Church, the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, the City of Boston, and national news.

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Emmanuel Magazine

The Emmanuel Magazine was established in 2000 by Sarah Welsh, Director of Communications and Community Relations. This publication replaced the previous College alumni publication the Emmanuel College magazine and was intended to expand coverage beyond alumni to Emmanuel Magazine, (Fall 2004)include events at the institution, faculty members, students and features of interests. In addition to Emmanuel’s news the magazine periodically contains the College’s giving reports.

The Emmanuel Magazine was published by the Office of Communications and Community Relations (later renamed Office of Government, Community and Public Relations) between 2000-c.2007. The periodical was published by the Office of Marketing and Communications between c.2007-2012. The publication took a two year hiatus during which time it was redesigned and responsibility for its publication became a shared function between the Office of the President and the Office of Development and Alumni Relations and the publication resumed in the spring of 2014. In the fall of 2016, the magazine was published by the Office of Marketing and Communications with the assistance of the Office of the President.

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Emmanuel News

UnprocessedEmmanuel News, (Apr.-May, 2000)

In existence by 1997 and published by the Office of Communications and Community Relations, the Emmanuel News covered the academic, cultural and social events of the College. In 2007, publication for the Emmanuel News became the responsibility of the Office of Marketing and Communications. In 2013, the Emmanuel News began to migrate to an online format. In 2014, the Emmanuel News was discontinued and news about the College was released on Emmanuel’s website

The Emmanuel News was the official College publication for the period between 1997 through 2014. The articles that appear in the newspaper deal with Emmanuel College and its role and role of its students in the larger Boston, MA and national communities.

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Epilogue: Emmanuel College Yearbooks

The Epilogue, Emmanuel College’s yearbook, is a student publication that has been in print since 1923, the year the College’s inaugural class graduated from the institution. The College Yearbooks were collected from various individuals and offices around campus and were, under the direction of Ann Grady Fleming ‘31, brought together under the regulation of the Alumnae Archives until around 2000 at which time the yearbooks entered into the Cardinal Cushing Library Special Collections. The Emmanuel College Archives gained jurisdiction over the College Yearbooks in 2012 and gains new editions with the assistance of the Emmanuel College yearbook staff and advisors.

The collection is a consecutive run of the Epilogue: Emmanuel College Yearbook for the years 1923 through 2011. It serves as a resource that Epilogue, (1930)records members of the student body and faculty. It also serves as a resource on College activities and events throughout College history. The 1992/1993 yearbook was published as part of reunion weekend in 1998.

The College Yearbooks were collected from various individuals and offices around campus and were, under the direction of Ann Grady Fleming ‘31, brought together under the regulation of the Alumnae Archives until around 2000 at which time the yearbooks entered into the Cardinal Cushing Library Special Collections. The Emmanuel College Archives gained jurisdiction over the College Yearbooks in 2012 and gained new editions with the assistance of the Emmanuel College yearbook advisors. Due to lack of interest, Epilogue ceased publication in 2012.

Emmanuel College’s digital archive includes all available volumes of the Epilogue yearbook as originally published. As with much historical material, the yearbooks occasionally depict instances of racist behavior, including blackface, cultural appropriation, and other racial stereotyping. Such content is offensive. We particularly regret such depictions as they violate Emmanuel’s deeply held commitment as a Catholic college to the dignity of every person and to the values of equality, inclusion and respect for all.

However, for the sake of historical accuracy, and in accord with professional guidelines for archivists, we maintain the full contents of each issue. To help readers further educate themselves regarding such objectionable material, the College has created this online resource, which provides background and links to scholarly materials addressing cultural appropriation, stereotyping and the historical context of racism in various forms.

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Ethos: Emmanuel College Student Literary Magazine

The Ethos, released in the fall of 1927 under the management of the senior class, accepted submissions from undergraduate students and alumnae. Its first issue cost .60 cents per issue or a $2.00 yearly subscription under the supervision of its first Editor-in-Chief Marguerite A. CoffeyEthos Cover ’28. The Ethos had the same aim as that of a previous mimeographed publication known as the E.C. (est. 1921), to preserve the welfare of and interest in Emmanuel College. The Ethos existed through the 1920s, 1930s, 1940s and 1950s as the College’s literary magazine that was released on a quarterly basis. As the publication entered the 1960s several changes occurred as frequency of publication fluctuated between twice and four times a year and by the end of the decade the Ethos cost $2.00 per issue or a $4.00 yearly subscription. By 1971 the Ethos staff began to accept faculty submissions. Due to decreased support, the Ethos ceased publication after the Spring 1971.

The Ethos: Emmanuel College Student Literary Magazine consists of forty-four (44) volumes. Although for most of its existence the Ethos was published on a quarterly basis (1927-1959, 1962-1964), it was published as little as three times a year (1959-1962, 1964-1966) and twice a year (1966-1971). It should also be noted that this publication has a volume numbering inconsistency that begins at volume thirty-six (36). It is unknown if this inconsistency if the result of a labeling mistakes or if there is a missing volume thirty-five (35). Be aware of this inconsistency that occurs in the year of 1961

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Publications on the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur

About the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur:

St. Julie Billiart founded the Sisters of Notre Dame with the aid of Françoise Blin de Bourdon in 1804. Motivated by the desire "to make known God's goodness," St. Julie established a Catholic religious congregation that today serves on five continents - Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. From the beginning, St. Julie and Françoise were convinced of education's power to help individuals to lead lives of freedom and human dignity. Their passion for teaching and learning is enshrined in theSr. Julie Billiart constitution of the Sisters of Notre Dame, which describes education as "fundamental to bringing about the reign of God."

Many of the principles St. Julie and Françoise established for the Sisters of Notre Dame more than 200 years ago still characterize the Congregation to this day: a passion for education as "the greatest work on earth," a commitment to the poor, a global apostolic mission, a life that balances prayer and action, a focus on community building, and an abiding and deeply rooted trust in the goodness of God. The first Sisters to Sr. Bilart Iconcome to America settled in Cincinnati in 1840. Nine years later, members of the Congregation came to Boston, where they taught at St. Mary School in the North End. From there, they established schools in Cambridge and Somerville and in mill towns such as Lynn, Lowell, Lawrence, Chicopee and Springfield.

About the Authors and Editors:

Fr. James Clare was a member of the Society of Jesus who was born on June 25, 1827 at St. Helen’s Lancashire, England. He entered the English Province of the Society of Jesus on September 7, 1844 and took his final vows on February 2, 1864 and earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from London University in 1849. Fr. Clare spent his professional life as a teacher, scholar, preacher and author of the treatise The Science of the Spiritual Life that discussed the Jesuit religious life and St. Ignatius. Fr. James Clare died on May 24, 1902 at St. Beuno’s in Wales.

Sr. Anthony of the Sacred Heart, a member of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, was born Sara Alice Quinlan in 1872 to Maurice J. and Kate E. (McGinnis) Quinlan and grew up in Oakland California where she was educated by the Sisters of the Holy Names at Saint Francis de Sales School. Sr. Anthony of the Sacred Heart, SND entered the novitiate in 1892 and spent her professional life as a teacher and administrator at the high school and college levels. She died on January 25, 1933 in Belmont, California.

Sr. Helen Louise, a member of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, was born Marie (or Mary Francis) Nugent on October 30, 1870 in Cincinnati, Ohio to James and Charlotte (Hopperton) Nugent. Sr. Helen Louise, SND entered the novitiate on August 23, 1891 in Cincinnati, Ohio and earned her doctorate in 1931 from Catholic University. Sr. Helen Louise spent her professional life as a teacher and administrator at the high school and college levels. She died on June 29, 1944 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Sr. Mary Patricia, SND, was born Helen Butler on November 20, 1859 in Cambridge, Massachusetts to Patrick and Mary (Kirwin) Butler. Sr. Mary Patricia joined the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur in 1882 and began teaching English at Trinity College in Washington, D.C. in 1902. However, due to increasing deafness, she later became the College librarian and was responsible for increasing the College library’s collection. In the 1920s she was the author of at least two books An Historical Sketch of Trinity College, 1897-1925 (published in 1925) and The American Foundations of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur (published in 1928). Sr. Mary Patricia, SND died on April 10, 1941.

Sr. Mary of the Holy Angels, SND, was born Maragret Patricia Linscott on June 9, 1919 to Jesse and Angela Linscott in Lancashire, England. She studied modern languages at the University of Liverpool and trained to teach with the Sisters of Notre Dame before entering the order in 1945. Sr. Mary of the Holy Angels, SND continued her academic studies and earned a Master's of Arts in Education from Liverpool University and a PhD in Religious Studies from the Catholic University of America. The in 1969, she was elected the fourteenth Superior General of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, a post she held until 1978. After stepping down as the Superior General of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, Sr. Mary of the Holy Angels, SND was appointed head of the Office for Congregation for Religious and Secular Institutes. Sr. Mary of Holy Angels, SND died on June 14, 1999 in Liverpool, England at the age of eighty.

The collection contains six (6) books that cover the people and events surrounding the establishment and works of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur and its establishment and works in the United States. The books were written by members of the Congregation in the 20th century. The collection is arranged into one (1) series of published books order chronologically by publication date and then alphabetically by the author’s name.

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Emmanuel College Student Literary Magazines

Innerscapes was a literary magazine published by the students of Emmanuel College during the 1980s. The editorial boards consisted of 2-3 people and the publications contained short stories and poetry written by students, as well as artwork and photos produced by students. The Emmanuel Advocate began publication in the Spring of 1990, headed up by editor Julie Anne Fiore, with the purpose of creating “a forum that will both enrich and educate us in the ‘facts’ of our lives,” essentially meaning that it was where the entirely female student body could freely express Saintly Review Cover, 2017their thoughts and ideas. Following this publication was The Current Focus, renamed to Kaleidoscope after one issue was published. These publications were initially led by Editor-in-Chief Danielle Radford, who sought to expand upon Kaleidoscope and make it more than a literary magazine, so as to include news stories (both news around the college and national news). Around 2002 Kaleidoscope came under new leadership and went back to strictly publishing works including poetry and short stories, rather than news reports.

The next publication entitled Bang! also served as a literary magazine, publishing short stories and poems produced by students. The most recent publication is The Saintly Review, published in September 2016. The editorial board is made up of 15 students and the publication coincides with the work of the “Editing and Publishing a Literary Magazine” course. The students were charged with not only producing their own literary works to include, but were responsible for each part of the production process, from deciding which works to include to designing the layout and submitting a final product for print.

The Emmanuel College Student Literary Magazines contains multiple publications from the period 1980 to the present. Although most of the magazines were published on a regular basis, the Emmanuel Advocate volumes have some repeating numbers, and were not necessarily published regularly. Kaleidoscope was published regularly for the first several issues, but does not seem to have been published regularly beginning in 2002. There are also periods of time between publications in which literary magazines seem to have not been published, including between Innerscapes and Emmanuel Advocate, then again between Kaleidoscope and Bang!  and The Saintly Review.

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Artist in Residence at Emmanuel College

The Emmanuel College Art Department offers an eight-week artists residency to four artists each summer from mid June to mid August. The residency supports a diverse group of artists, providing time and space for established and emerging artists to develop their work.Cathedral & Belfry, (2012)

The Art Department specifically aims to award a residency to one individual from each of the four categories: ceramics, photography, printmaking and social justice. Fostering creative and artistic excellence, the residency also plays an important role in advancing the visual arts on the Emmanuel campus, providing an important educational program on contemporary art accessible to students, staff and faculty.

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Emmanuel College Oral Histories

The oral histories were conducted by the Cardinal Cushing Library and Learning Commons, beginning in June 2012 to provide greater insight into the history of Emmanuel College (Boston, Massachusetts). The purpose endeavors to create a collection of recorded spoken memories that E. O'Hearn Senior Portrait, (1947)capture College alumni, faculty, Administrators’ and staffs’ memories about the College and their personal lives from the 1930s to the present. In addition, the collection seeks to gain the memories of individuals related to the College.

The collection contains oral histories in a digital format that are stored on the Cardinal Cushing Library’s shared drive and on a dvd. Each interview may contain a biographical form of the interviewee, a deed of gift (where applicable) and a transcript of the interview. This collection also contains supplemental material to the oral histories that complements and enhance the interviews.

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Ephemera Collection of Emmanuel College

Unprocessed

The foundations of this collection date back to the early history of the College, when individual offices and students would save the ephemera that they produced for a specific event. This was a practice that continued for decades until 2010 when the Emmanuel College Archives assumed official jurisdiction.Yawkey Dedication (2004)

As the name would suggest, ephemera tends to be transitory documents created for a specific purpose, and intended to be thrown away. The collection comprises primary sources relating to the events of Emmanuel College, including the lecture series, invitations, event announcements, pamphlets and College view books. The printed material was produced as the events unfolded and offers unique snapshots of the institution’s past.

Printed ephemera has had multiple purposes, as instanced by the variety of material assembled in the collection. A primary purpose was the distribution of information. In the days before television and the World Wide Web, the community received news by way of broadsides and printed ephemera.

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Photograph Archives of Emmanuel College

UnprocessedSr Elizabeth & Ginny Farber lerparente

The material in this collection contains photographs, negatives, ephemera, newspaper clippings and slides related to Emmanuel College from the 20th and 21st centuries that may or may not have been used in official College publications. In addition, some material within the collection may be under copyright protection. The collection covers such topics as the City of Boston, the Emmanuel College campus, events, sports and individuals.

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